Change the world

Development Studies

There will be no second semester intake

MA DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (COURSEWORK)
 
Masters of Arts in Development Studies (Qualification Code: 40525)
 
NQF Level 9: 180 credits
 
Purpose
 
The Master of Arts in Development Studies degree programme, offered by coursework and treatise, aims to develop intellectually independent development specialists with the ability to engage in sustainable socio–economic development practice and research activities, while maintaining ethical standards. Graduates will have acquired in-depth theoretical knowledge and insights to approach development issues from a variety of perspectives, demonstrating critical competencies and lifelong learning leading to successful careers as development practitioners in the public sector, NGOs, multi and bilateral agencies, embassies, as members of international trade missions and as consultants in educational and cultural exchanges, among others. Furthermore, graduates will be able to engage with and critique current theory and policy, and advance scholarship by conducting research in socio-economic reconstruction and development, disseminating findings and conclusions, thus making a significant contribution to the development of knowledge and professional practice in this field at an advanced level.
 
Admission requirements:
 
  • A cognate honours degree, postgraduate diploma, 480-credit bachelor’s degree or an equivalent qualification at NQF Exit Level 8, with all major modules passed with at least 60% or attained at an equivalent grade and level.
  • Included in the above will be a level appropriate externally examined and/or moderated research project, mini-dissertation or treatise of at least 8,000 to 10,000 words and a module in research methods/ methodology, each passed with at least 60% or attained at an equivalent grade and level. 
  • Candidates considered for admission on the strength of a qualification that does not include a module in research methods/methodology and a research project, mini-dissertation or treatise of at least 8,000 – 10,000 words will be required to complete and pass such additional modules at the appropriate level, each with at least 60% prior to acceptance for registration for the master’s degree.
  • Students in possession of a cognate Bachelor of Technology degree (BTech) may be admitted with the understanding that additional requirements as a condition for admission may be recommended by the HOD for approval by the RTIC of the relevant School within the Faculty. Such additional requirements may include, but are not limited to the following:
    • Register for and pass, with at least 60% or attain at an equivalent grade, an additional module or modules at the appropriate level;
    • Obtain a further 120-credit qualification at the appropriate level (e.g. a cognate postgraduate diploma or an honours degree).
    • Submit and orally defend a draft research proposal.

Conditions that apply

  1. Timeous application is required to allow for a thorough adjudication of applications.
  2. Upon application, candidates, who have not previously studied at Nelson Mandela University, will be required to submit an official, verified transcript of their academic record that, where applicable, includes the syllabus of each module passed in their preceding degree programme together with a copy of the research project, mini-dissertation or treatise.
  3. The acceptance of an application is subject to the availability of the implied supervisory capacity, both in terms of time and expertise.
  4. International students who have completed previous qualifications in a language other than English must submit proof of English language proficiency reflecting minimum adequate scores as follows:

v  IELTS:            6.5 minimum overall score with minimums of 6 in each section;

v  TOEFL:

  • Paper-based (PBT) – 580 minimum overall score with minimums of 53 in listening, 52  in reading and 59  in structure/written;
  • Computer-based (CBT): 237 minimum overall score with minimums of 19 in listening, 19 in reading and 25 in structure/written;
  • Internet-based (IBT): 92 minimum overall score with minimums of 18 in listening, 17 in reading, 22 in writing and 22 in speaking.

Duration of the programme

The programme of study shall extend over a minimum period of one year and a maximum period of four years (General Rule G4.2 applies).

 
Re-admission:
 
Candidates who have not completed the degree after four years of study must apply for readmission. Should such candidates be re-admitted, the retention of credits already obtained towards the degree shall be subject to departmental approval (Rule G3.7).
General Except as otherwise provided below, the degree of Master of Arts shall be awarded in accordance with the General Rules for Master's Degrees as published in the General Prospectus and the Postgraduate Research Policy.

CURRICULUM

Not all modules may necessarily be offered in a particular year, please consult the timetable for modules offered.

 

Module Name

Module Code

Presented

Credits

Assessment

NQF Level

Compulsory Modules:

 

 

 

 

 

Development Studies Treatise

DEV510

Year

80

Internal and External Examination - Treatise

9

Advanced Development Policy

DEV502

Semester 2

20

Exam

9

Advanced Development Theory

DEV501

Semester 1

20

Exam

9

Select three of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

Development Economics

DEV512

Semester 2

20

Exam

9

International Finance

DEV511

Semester 1

20

Exam

9

Democratic Transitions and Economic Reconstruction

DEV532

Semester 2

20

Exam

9

Political Geography: Space, State and Nations

    DEV542

Semester 2

    20

Exam

    9

Monitoring and Evaluation for Development Practitioners

    DEV522

Semester 1

    20

Exam

    9

Political Economy of Development

    DEV552

Semester 1

    20

Exam

    9

Social Movements, Social Change and Development

    DEV521

Semester 2

    20

Exam

    9

Total credits

  180

 

 

DEV 510                    DEVELOPMENT STUDIES TREATISE             80 CREDITS

PURPOSE

To guide students to conduct research in the field of Development Studies and to write a treatise

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Identify and formulate a suitable research topic in the field of Development Studies
  • Conduct a literature review that frames the topic
  • Prepare a research design with appropriate methodologies
  • Collect, analyse and present the data
  • Draft, edit and present the treatise in the appropriate format.

CORE CONTENT

A treatise of approximately 100 pages (30,000 words) based upon a topic in the selected research area and with evidence of substantive data analysis.

ASSESSMENT

Internal and external examination of the treatise: 100%

PRE-REQUISITES

None

DEV502                     ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT POLICY                          20 CREDITS

PURPOSE
To elucidate the relationship between macro-meso- and micro-level development policy with a view to examining selected models of the development policy environment and the policy process

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Analyse and critique the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of the notion of social justice
  • Provide a historical review of the origins of contemporary development policy
  • Highlight and critique key events in the policy development process and discuss the changing nature of development policies
  • Explain the centrality of economic theory and practice to past and present development policy
  • Critique development policy theory and practice by applying meta-theoretical principles and concepts
  • Differentiate and draw parallels between positivist, post-positivist and postmodernist approaches to development policy
  • Analyse and critique development policy processes in individual countries by means of a case study analysis
  • Relate the concept of macro- economic policy - a key aspect of development policy in a developing country - to industrial policy
  • Differentiate between Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI) and Export Oriented Industrialization (EOI)
  • Analyse and review the tensions caused by  sub-national industrial policies
  • Analyse and compare the complexities of the privatization process with reference to specific case studies
  • Critique different approaches to and interpretations  of state reform with special reference to centralization and decentralisation
  • Conduct a macro, meso and micro frame analysis to investigate and review the transition of development policy to a development programme in action
  • Differentiate between ‘main stream’ and ‘alternative’ development strategies
  • Outline and critique the approaches to Developmental Local Government
  • Recommend alternative approaches to the challenges associated with Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) legislation as it relates to sustainable development.

CORE CONTENT
 

Macro development policy

  • Industrial policy
  • Structural adjustment programmes
  • Development finance
  • Sustainable development
  • Environmental policy, human rights and development policy.

Meso development policy

  • Integrated regional development
  • Gender and development policy
  • Appropriate technology and sustainable development
  • Food policy

Micro development policy

  • Environmental impact assessment (EIA)
  • Social impact assessment
  • The role of NGO’s
  • South African local development case studies.

 

EVALUATION

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION
External

 

PREREQUISITES

None

DEV501                     ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT THEORY           20 CREDITS

PURPOSE
Students will be equipped with specialist knowledge of contemporary development theory and discourse, enabling them to engage with and critique current research and practice in the field .

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Formulate a coherent exposition of  the relationship(s) between development and social change
  • Discuss critically the nature of social theorizing and its application to development theory
  • Compare the macro development theories of modernization with dependence theories
  • Describe the theoretical links between growth and modernization theory
  • Discuss the relationship between structuralism and dependency theory
  • Compare and critique different schools of neo-Marxist development theory
  • Provide a substantive overview and critique of conventional contemporary theories of development
  • Provide a substantive overview and critique of alternative conceptualizations and models of development
  • Compare and critique the neo-classical and neo-liberal approaches to development
  • Outline and explain the complexities and contradictions in the relationship that exists between economic growth, development and the environment
  • Discuss the dynamics of gender analysis in development
  • Analyse and describe the dialogical intervention strategy as a methodological vehicle for the application of aspects of micro-foundational development
  • Present a critical overview of the nature and implications of postmodernism and post-development theory for contemporary development studies
  • Discuss the dynamics of the relationship between development and globalization
  • Analyse the relationship between the state and development
  • Analyse and review the interplay of ethnicity, social, cultural and economic factors on the forces of globalization
  • Analyse and explain key institutional factors that either  enhance or inhibit development
  • Discuss the tension between theory and practice in participatory approaches
  • Provide an exposition of the major issues underpinning the question of ‘cultural imperialism’ and explain how these influence the theory and practice of development
  • Review and critique the writings of selected theorists on the politics of cultural affirmation and resistance
  • Reflect and critically discuss the various articulations of the notion ‘African Renaissance’.

CORE CONTENT

  • Contemporary development theories and processes
  • Macro-theoretical perspectives including modernization theory, dependency theory and neo-liberalism,  human-centred and alternative approaches
  • The implications of globalisation on ethnic, social, cultural and economic relations
  • Developmental discourse and exploration of new approaches informed by, inter alia, post-modern social theory.

EVALUATION CRITERIA

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

MODERATION
External

PREREQUISITES

None

 

DEV512                     DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS                          20 CREDITS

PURPOSE
To equip students with knowledge of and the competence to apply economic concepts, principles and analysis to challenges facing emerging and developing economies

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Use contemporary economic theory and apply the discourse of Development Economics to identify, analyse and explain barriers to development in various sectors of the economy
  • Apply appropriate theoretical and analytical tools to analyse, explain and propose strategies to resolve socio-economic challenges facing developing countries
  • Investigate and discuss the impact of debt, foreign aid, foreign direct investment, the World Bank and the IMF on economic development of developing and underdeveloped countries
  • Identify and describe the economic and institutional characteristics that developing countries share
  • Analyse selected cases to determine why   some poor countries catch up to rich nations, while others remain caught up in a poverty trap
  • Discuss the importance of institutions like property rights and economic mobility in socio-economic development
  • Explain why human capital matters for socio-economic development and propose policies that will promote the accumulation of human capital
  • Discuss factors that impede the socio-economic development of developing countries and propose ways to approach challenges faced by these countries.

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Key concepts in economic development
  • Theories of economic growth
  • The extent of inequality and poverty
  • The impact of high fertility and population growth upon development
  • The importance of education and health care
  • Debt, foreign aid, foreign direct investment, the World Bank and the IMF

 

EVALUATION

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

PREREQUISITES

None

 

 

DEV511                                 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE                    20 CREDITS

PURPOSE
To familiarise candidates with the theories, concepts, principles and practices pertinent to international finance

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Describe the international financial system and financial markets with reference to key principles, concepts and operations in international finance
  • Compare and appraise theories that underlie current thinking in  international finance and investment
  • Critique the application  of the theories that underlie current thinking in  international finance and investment in practical situations
  • Point out and describe particular flaws apparent in the role and functions of the international financial system, and recommend alternative options 
  • Review and critique cases of recent  international financial crises
  • Describe and outline the advantages and dangers associated with alternative sources of finance available to multinational corporations in making capital structure decisions
  • Discuss and evaluate the impact of financial reporting and the media on the global financial milieu
  • Analyse and appraise management and strategic contexts in which international finance decisions are made
  • Analyse and discuss the impact of international funds flow, balance of payments (BOP) and foreign direct investment on international finance
  • Compare the merchandise trade with the services trade of selected industrialised countries and explain why the latter has become more significant to BOP than the former  
  • Explain  and critique the workings of the equity, money and bond markets
  • Describe the political risks faced by multinational enterprises engaged in foreign direct investment and propose alternative strategies for managing such risks and exposures
  • Identify and provide reasons for international financial market failures and propose corrective strategies
  • Describe the key stipulations of International Law and their consequences as far as foreign investments are concerned.

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Introduction to the concepts of risk and return
  • The international monetary system
  • Financial systems and institutions
  • Equity markets
  • The money market
  • Bond markets
  • The foreign exchange markets
  • Exchange rate determination and forecasting
  • Exposure management
  • Financing the global firm
  • Capital budgeting for international projects
  • African international finance
  • International Law

 

EVALUATION CRITERIA

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION
External

 

PREREQUISITES

None

 

DEV532         DEMOCRATIC TRANSITIONS & ECONOMIC

           RECONSTRUCTION                                                          20 CREDITS

PURPOSE
To equip candidates with knowledge of and insight into the relation between post-conflict economic reconstruction and the transition to democracy in developing and emerging economies

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Review the values and attitudes that underpin selected functioning in democracies in relation to the theoretical foundations and principles of the concept democracy
  • Critique the values and principles on which the policy of inclusivity is founded
  • Discuss democracy as a conflict management system by reviewing the processes that regulate competition among groups with conflicting preferences
  • Propose an alternative to the traditional linear or sequential model of transition from authoritarian to democratic  rule, one that accounts for the complex challenges posed by the socio-political upheavals typically associated with this type of transformation
  • By means of selected case studies, analyse and discuss critical dimensions of democratic practices
  • Review the historical, political socio-economic, ethnic and cultural dimensions that influence elections in various countries
  • Discuss the impact of legal frameworks on electoral conflict.

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Democracy
  • Democratic transition
  • Democratic elections and electioneering
  • Inclusivity vs exclusivity
  • Dimensions of democratic practice
  • Nation building and economic reconstruction

 

EVALUATION

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION
External

 

PREREQUISITES

None

 

DEV542         POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY: SPACE, STATE AND NATIONS                                                                                                                                   20 CREDITS

PURPOSE

To examine the spatial implications of political policies and decisions within defined territories.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Discuss the historical evolution of theories of geopolitics
  • Analyse and explain the relationship between power and space as manifested in geopolitical theories and practices
  • By means of case studies, explore and describe the political implications of radical reorganization of public space
  • Investigate and report on the state as a concept of governance
  • Examine selected regional and global state systems and report critically on the internal organisation of these states
  • Explore and propose resolutions to the ensuing opportunities for conflict within a spatial framework at variance with the system of states  
  • Investigate and describe the impact of selected political decisions upon the territory and sovereignty of South Africa

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Geopolitical theories and practices
  • The significance of political control of space
  • The state as a concept of governance
  • Regional and global state systems and the internal organisation of states
  • Conflict resolution within a spatial framework at variance with the system of states   
  • The impact of selected political decisions upon the territory and sovereignty of South Africa
  • Development and the content of Political Geography
  • South Africa: the post-apartheid city
  • The land issue in South Africa
  • Classical geopolitics and contemporary geopolitics

 

ASSESSMENT

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION

External

 

PRE-REQUISITES

None

DEV522         MONITORING AND EVALUATION FOR DEVELOPMENT      

                      PRACTITIONERS                                                               20 CREDITS

PURPOSE

To equip students with the knowledge and competence to work effectively within and improve on monitoring and evaluation systems for organisations focusing on development

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The student will be able to

  • Design appropriate and relevant survey questionnaires
  • Develop performance indicators and social capital assessments tools 
  • Conduct quantitative and qualitative delivery and public expenditure surveys
  • Monitor and evaluate development progress quantitatively and qualitatively
  • Utilise monitoring and evaluation tools[1] and prepare findings in appropriate format
  • Draw sensible conclusions and prepare coherent reports 
  • Identify and assess core welfare indicators

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Development qualitative and quantitative monitoring and evaluation tools
  • Questions and criteria for evaluations
  • Methods and techniques for evaluations   
  • Outcome monitoring and outcome evaluation
  • Readiness assessment, rapid appraisal and participatory impact assessment
  • Public expenditure tracking surveys
  • Quantitative and qualitative delivery surveys
  • Developing performance indicators for monitoring
  • Core welfare indicators
  • Social capital assessment tool
  • Beneficiary assessment
  • Citizen report cards
  • Participatory public expenditure

 

ASSESSMENT

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION

External

 

PRE-REQUISITES FOR THIS MODULE

None

 

 

DEV552         POLITICAL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT              20 CREDITS

PURPOSE

To equip students with specialist knowledge of and insight into Political Economy of Development through an examination of the relevant theoretical and applied literature

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will be able to

  • Compare and critique classical and contemporary political economic traditions
  • Describe the institutional and political constraints and enablers of development
  • Compare radical and critical Marxian approaches to development and underdevelopment
  • Evaluate the structural and historical particularities of development and underdevelopment on local, national and international levels
  • By means of institutional and cultural case studies and the application of secondary research methodology, explore the application of relevant paradigms and concepts of the political economy of development
  • Critique the so-called “new statism” as a contemporary institutionalist way of thinking and outline its implications for the political economy of development practice.

 

CORE CONTENT

  • The Political Economic tradition in its classical and contemporary forms
  • The Political Economic approach within classical and contemporary development theory
  • The interplay between contemporary capitalism, globalization and production
  • 21st century global neo-liberalism and the paradox of sustainable production
  • The international division of labour
  • Inequality and economic  growth and accelerated elite accumulation
  • Race, class and gender in international development
  • The new statism: implications for development practice

 

ASSESSMENT

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION

External

 

PRE-REQUISITES FOR THIS MODULE

None

 

CO-REQUISITES FOR THIS MODULE

None

 

DEV521         SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, SOCIAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT                                                                                                                         20 CREDITS

PURPOSE

To equip candidates with specialist knowledge of and competence to relate contemporary social movements theory and practices to social change and development policy and practice in a range of contexts

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will be able to

  • Relate and apply contemporary social movements theory to specific manifestations of social change and development
  • Examine and report  reflectively on ways in which work and employment are experienced in different geographical domains by different social groupings
  • Compare and critique different approaches and paradigms to power, authority, legitimacy and consent, nonviolent conflict and civil resistance
  • Identify core differences in shifting approaches to social movements and explain how these relate to shifting realities for labour in developing regions
  • Analyse and critique current research with regard to the objectives and strategies of social movements and the effectiveness of such movements in bringing about social change and development
  • Investigate and report on the  impact of social movements on government, with specific reference to economic policy and socio-economic development  
  • Investigate and report on the influence of social movements on the private sector and on the behaviour of ordinary citizens.

 

CORE CONTENT

  • Theoretical foundations of contemporary social movement theory and practice
  • Key concepts: Power, authority, legitimacy and consent
  • Core theory: social change social movement, civil society, civil resistance and nonviolent conflict
  • Objectives, strategies and social base of movements
  • Social movements and change in developing societies 
  • The impact of social movements and change on government
  • The impact of social movements and change on the private sector and civil society

 

ASSESSMENT

Examination. 50% class mark, 50% exam mark.

 

MODERATION

External

 

PRE-REQUISITES FOR THIS MODULE

None



 

 

Contact information
Mr Andrew Thuo
Programme Coordinator
Tel: 0415044900
Andrew.Thuo2@mandela.ac.za